Thursday, November 30, 2017

First Line Friday: Eleanor Edition...I've Lost Count

Hoarding Books

Whew! The last couple of weeks have been CRAZY. I missed a couple FLFs because work was insane and then last week I was in such a blissful turkey coma with my food baby that I could not be bothered to do much more than lift up a book in front of my face. Now the food baby is gone and I am sad that the turkey is too.

This week my line is from a book I was not-so-patiently waiting for, and finally have in my hands. I'm very interested to see what it has to say about Eleanor and Aquitaine, and hopefully will assist me in my own research on the medieval queen. It will not surprise you if you saw this week's Top Ten Tuesday (and you really should look because it was a very fabulous list) that I am showing off a book from Amberley.

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"Heroines come in many different forms, and it is no less true for medieval heroines."

Leave a comment and/or your first line, then head over to Hoarding Books to see what other first lines you might discover today.

Happy Reading,
Sarah

16 comments:

  1. My first line Friday is from Christmas Magic by Cathy Kelly

    Primrose Cottage sat at the very end of Johnson’s Lane, an enchantingly pretty little house with wisteria snaking into the low roof and rose bushes clustering up to peer in the windows.

    Happy Friday!

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    1. Happy Saturday, thanks for stopping by! Love the imagery in that line.

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  2. Heroines do, indeed, come in many different forms!

    Today I'm featuring Cowboy Christmas Guardian by Dana Mentink (because it's December and all).

    The first line of the book I'm reading is: "Not Now. For the love of candy canes, not now." From I'll Be Home for Christmas Collection by Bonnie Calhoune, Jill Kemerer, Allie Pleiter, and Lenora Worth

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    1. Yes they do, and I am so psyched to get into this one. Thanks for sharing your line, happy Saturday!

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  3. That first line is totally true!

    I’m sharing about The Austen Escape on my blog today, but the closest book to me is Christmas at Carton by Tamera Alexander, so I’ll use that here.

    November 13, 1863
    Franklin, Tennessee
    21 Miles South of Nashville

    “Very nice stitching, Mrs. Prescott.”

    Happy Friday!

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    1. Right, I am really interested in how the various women are portrayed as heroines, I think it is going to be really good. Happy Saturday!

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  4. Happy Friday, Sarah!

    PROLOGUE
    LONDON, ENGLAND
    MAY 1817

    I sat across the table from the man I most admired, feeling self-conscious. - The Secret of Pembrooke Park by Julie Klassen

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    1. Happy Saturday Caryl, thanks for coming by to share your line!

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  5. Sounds like a really interesting book!

    Happy Friday!
    My first line is from First Street Church Romances: Love’s Christmas Cheer by Alexa Verde:

    “Hurting her co-chef wasn’t an option.”

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    1. Yes, I think it will be. There is quite a variety of heroines to be discussed, so it should make for a great read. Happy Saturday!

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  6. Happy Friday!

    I like that first line!

    Today, over on my blog, I am showcasing Cara Putman’s novel, Imperfect Justice. I am so excited to review this book. I have heard so many good things. On my site, I used the first lines from the prologue, so here I will share the first sentence from chapter 1.

    “Emelie Wesley glanced at her watch and frowned.”

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    1. Thanks Nicole, me too. I think it will be a great read and a new way of looking at what a 'heroine' really is. Thanks for sharing your line, happy Saturday!

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  7. Happy Friday!

    January 1894
    Denver, CO
    The cheerful tinkle of a bell alerted Grace Mallory to the arrival of a guest.
    - Heart on the Line by Karen Witemeyer

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    1. Happy Saturday Erin, thanks for coming by!

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  8. When I studied history in school, it was all about the men. The women were only included based on who they were married to (the six wives of Henry VIII) or who their parents were (the two daughters of Henry VIII). It's great to see some books showing the other side of history.

    I'm sharing from The Last Summer by Brandy Bruce on my blog today. Great book!

    I'm currently reading Out of the Ordinary by the always-witty Jen Turano. Here's the (long) opening line:

    Slipping through the crowd gathered on the upper deck of a most extravagant yacht, Miss Gertrude Cadwalader drew in a breath and adopted an air of what she hoped would be taken for nonchalance.

    With a start like that, I'm expecting another winner!

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    1. Truthfully I do not remember learning as much in school about history as I did on my own. I have always loved history, but like you, it was not always history that I was interested in. We should be teaching about great men AND women, which I think is being remedied much more quickly now. I wish I had learned about Eleanor of Aquitaine a long time ago.

      I have heard quite a bit about The Last Summer and I am thinking I will have to get around to reading it. It has been featured so many times, there must be something to it.

      Happy Saturday!

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