Saturday, May 19, 2018

Stacking the Shelves 20


Stacking the Shelves is a weekly feature co-hosted by Tynga's Reviews and Reading Reality. It is a chance to showcase all the goodies you've collected throughout the week, whether they're bought on-line or in-store, an ARC or a final copy, borrowed from a friend or the library, physical or digital, etc. Never has my addiction been more obvious than when I am now keeping track of every single book I acquire.

Amazon
17289930 18593101 14680501

Kindle Unlimited
32471499 38724054 37540850
37003347 37651557 37809400
39729934 37819590 38560707

Much like the Charles River Editors books I have mentioned in the past, these Hourly History books are short and concise. I find this series to be of better quality than the Charles River ones, though they can sometimes be hit or miss. For the most part they are much more accurate and contain fewer typos and errors of that nature.

Happy Reading!
Sarah

24 comments:

  1. Nice to see you back. I was beginning to worry......

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    1. Oh, thank you! Feeling better today. On Tuesday I had a student have two very physical episodes and having to move around trying to contain him and keep him away from the students he was going after caused me quite a bit of pain. I went to school Wednesday but came home at noon because it was too much. Doctor wants me to rest as much as possible, so I am trying to do that, but am having no pain today, finally!

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    2. Good to hear you're almost back to full health. Sorry to hear about your classroom issues.

      Picked up a reasonable 6 books this week:

      Fiction:

      Rotherweird by Andrew Caldecott
      The Legacy by Yrsa Sigurdardottir
      If We Were Villains by M L Rio

      Non-Fiction:

      How to Build a Universe by Brian Cox, Robin Ince and Alexandra Feachem
      Turn the Ship Around! - A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders by L David Marquet
      Start with Why - How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action by Simon Sinek

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    3. Thank you! This was the worst episode the student has had and he was really aggressive with all three of us adults who were attempting to at least contain the situation to keep him and the other students safe. It was pretty bad.

      Six is definitely reasonable, good job! Every week I try to set the goal of five or less, unless I am getting them via Kindle Unlimited. It never works.

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  2. Oh! Those Titanic books are available in a collection -- "The Story of the Titanic As Told By Its Survivors".

    Sorry to hear about that student -- what age group do you teach?


    I managed not to buy anything, but on Kindle Unlimited I checked out a science book ("Stuff Matters"). Still waiting for Exploding the Phones to come in...

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    1. Thank you - five student days left and EVERYONE is counting down! I teach 3rd/4th/5th graders in a self-contained Behavior Skills classroom.

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  3. I love the Hourly History books. Haven't read one in a while, though. And you're right, they can be hit or miss but still can't resist them when I see one I like.

    My STS

    Happy Reading! ♥

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    1. Same, they are hard to resist! It has been such a compulsion the last couple days to return one when I am done and immediately grab the next one that shows up as 'others books of interest'!

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  4. Nice haul! Oh, seeing that Titanic title reminded me that I too have a Titanic title that I got on Amazon for free and I haven't read it yet :D

    I hope you enjoy your new reads.

    My STS: http://flippingthruthepages.com/2018/05/stacking-the-shelves-24/

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    1. I have read so many books about Titanic, but so few by survivors and I am glad to finally be getting around to them. Thanks for coming by!

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  5. The Titanic always freaks me out. Not freaks out PER SE, but just... it's so horrible I have hard time even wanting to read about it? If that makes sense. anyway... love the look of some of these. Eleanor of Aquitaine, William the Conqueror, Genghis Khan, the Byzantines. So much fascinating history.

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    1. I am kind of like you in that the depth of the tragedy and the senseless loss of life is just so enormous, how do we even possibly try to process it all? But on the other hand, I feel like I have to know as much as possible about the people who made the journey, to know their stories and who they were and what they were traveling for, so that they are not forgotten. Their stories keep them alive, now so long after they've gone.

      I was pleasantly surprised by the Eleanor one, did not cater to the most salacious gossip (most not likely true anyway) about her. She was no saint of course, but I find most of the rumors pretty hard to believe. Give the series a try, all free with Kindle Unlimited and TONS of great subjects.

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    2. Nice! I will definitely look into those! And well said about the Titanic- as horrible and mind- numbing as it is, you are right- those people deserve to be remembered, and that's a great way to look at it!

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    3. Cool, let me know which ones you try. I am reading one about the Byzantine Empire right now.

      I won't lie, the 15 year old in me loves the movie and loves the story of Jack and Rose, despite it being complete and utter fiction. But the huge hubbub over the movie caused me to start reading about the disaster, what the movie got right, what it got wrong, and also helped me learn some of the stories of those most often overlooked.

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  6. Your haul looks great! I would love to learn about those people. I actually read one Hourly History book about Florence Nightingale, and really enjoyed it. The shortness is indeed a plus!

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    1. Agreed! I have now begun using these books as a way to judge my interest in a topic, kind of like I do with the Charles River Editors books. If the general history can pique my interest, I probably won't get through a longer, more details book about the subject if I am that uninterested. Plus, books like this help out at the end of the year if I am behind on my Goodreads Challenge!

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  7. That sounds like a really challenging day in the classroom for you and I hope you're doing ok now. There's an article in one of the magazines in my Sunday paper about Dan Snow and he mentions his female stalkers making him nervous...I hope he's not talking about you!

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/dan-snow-being-part-famous-12552784

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    1. That was the worst episode this student had, and he was very aggressive with me and two other adults attempting to assist. It was tough, that is for sure. Some days it is really, really hard to go to work but all I have to do is remind myself of why I do my job, based on this quote that I love: "The kids who need love the most will ask for it in the most unloving of ways". That pretty much sums up my work in one little sentence.

      Dan Snow is quite the historian himself, but my guy is Dan Jones - but oh Lord would I be absolutely mortified if he ever said that in an interview because I would immediately and forever think he was talking about me! But then again, he did sit and talk with me, so he can't think I am THAT crazy...can he? LOL!

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    2. Oops, sorry about that! My brain obviously wasn't working yesterday as I should know the difference!

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    3. It actually happens quite a bit I have noticed!! The two have even done a couple segments together and I am pretty sure Jones has talked about being mistaken for one another in a Friday Live video at some point. Jones is by no means short (has a couple inches on me and I am nearly 5'10) but Snow is like, 6'6.

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  8. I'm kind of obsessed about Jack the Ripper so I may have to look into that one. Great haul!

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    1. Thank you Barb! I am finding that this short series actually steers toward the middle of the road instead of going one way or the other off into the void of salacious gossip just to sell books. But all those 'possiblies' and 'perhaps' to get tedious sometimes. Still, check them out and let me know how you like them!

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  9. The Hourly History books look like a fun way to study. I am building up the stamina for another bash at the Simon Schama Brish history trilogy. I love the subject and his writing style, but am always discouraged by how little of the information actually sticks in my brain

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    1. Same here!!! I devoured quite quickly the first volume - big surprise, it covered all my faves and very conveniently ends where my interest starts to wane - 1603. I can do some of James' reign, but by then the world is becoming too modern and the spell is broken for me. Maybe some day we can try to buddy read them, lol - see how far we get!

      I have had some better luck with the Hourly History ones and they are easily digestible in far less than an hour. Some questionable conclusions sometimes, but usually erring on the side of caution and presenting theories/multiple possible outcomes, that sort of thing.

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