Saturday, July 14, 2018

Stacking the Shelves #27



Stacking the Shelves is a weekly feature co-hosted by Tynga's Reviews and Reading Reality. It is a chance to showcase all the goodies you've collected throughout the week, whether they're bought on-line or in-store, an ARC or a final copy, borrowed from a friend or the library, physical or digital, etc. Never has my addiction been more obvious than when I am now keeping track of every single book I acquire.

Library (Withdrawn from Circulation)
1017462 7577924 3684932
11351519 2934222 12987640
6060781 18079687 2608930
11396195 1027701 16248085
5496814 2217906
17987664 6847008

What did you add to your stash this week?

Happy Reading!
Sarah

20 comments:

  1. Numerati was a good book, but unless that's a new edition you may find it a bit dated. "Worm" is one I've looked at a time or two myself, but haven't bought yet. Really interested in "The Big Disconnect!"

    As for me, I picked up two science books: The Ends of the Earth, about previous mass extinctions and their causes; and Virolution, which I think examines the role of viruses in driving evolution in other species. The cover is....fun.

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51HkbnaEXdL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
    ^^ I'm a little dubious about that "Most important book since The Selfish Gene!' line on the cover, since it looks more like a subtitle than a blurb!

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    1. Numerati is not a new edition - probably why the library withdrew it! It's got some interesting parts but it is kind of...boring.

      Who is the author of The Ends of the Earth? I want to add it to my TBR but there are a million books with that title!

      That statement is weird and I agree, it is the sub title. How strange, and a very bold claim to make. Let me know if it lives up to it!

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    2. It didn't help that I gave you the wrong title! Try "Ends of the World" by Peter Brannen.

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    3. I agree with Stephen: 'The Big Disconnect' looks interesting...

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    4. Got the right one added to my TBR. I might even have to see if our library has it, though I am trying reeeeeally hard to not check out any books, while I still have tons of books that I own, calling for my attention.

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    5. I thought so too when I first grabbed it from the 'withdrawn' cart. But some of the reviews are pretty terrible. It's a good thing it was free!

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    6. A newer book that may be of interest (as a parent) is "iGen". I've been debating putting in an interlibrary loan request. I'm not a parent, but today's kids are tomorrow's adults, and I'm interested in how tech is wiring their heads with such early exposure. Ours is probably the last generation to have anything to compare the Now against -- we can remember before cellphones were common, let alone universal portable computers, and can remember when the Internet was this new and separate world to explore, instead of something as routine as plumbing and streets.

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    7. I do often wonder what we're doing to our kids and what we're allowing them to do. They've taken to technology like a fish to water but I can't help wondering how many of them can truly swim and how many of them, and us oldies, will drown.

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    8. @Stephen - I've added it to my TBR. We really are the bridge between Then and Now. I remember how obnoxious dial-up was, how huge cell phones used to be (remember the 'bag phones' fr the car??), and that floppy discs were a thing, not just an icon on the computer to save your work.

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    9. @CyberKitten - The use of technology today is very alarming to me, especially when I see 2 and 3 year olds with iPads, glued to the screen. That much screen time is terrible. I do admit to having the TV on for Eleanor when she was itty bitty, but it was always educational things like Sesame Street, Super Why, Word World, etc. I do not have a tablet for her, but she has a Kindle Fire at her dad's. The biggest problem is that these kids are learning to interact with other people through a screen and not in the real world. There is no concept of social skills and face to face communication. It is a very scary prospect for these kids.

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  2. I read Imagine awhile ago and it was a fascinating one. Enjoy.

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    1. Thank you! I was kind of surprised to see it on the 'withdrawn' cart. I have heard some great things about it.

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  3. You got alot of books. Enjoy your haul 😊

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    1. Thank you! This was from two separate trips to the library. One of the librarians joked that it was so good I was taking all of these, because then it was making more room on the cart for other withdrawn books...which in turn again means more for me!

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  4. Like you I had a good haul this week - although my friends think I'm crazy. I picked up 4 books on Thursday from my local supermarket (where I get a lot of my modern crime & bestsellers from) and the rest from a trip on Friday (day off work) to my two favourite 'remainder' books shops. They were:

    Fiction:

    Broken Angels by Richard Morgan
    Nastromo by Joseph Conrad
    Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
    Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
    Glory: A Story of Galliploi by Rachel Billington
    Three Miles by Robert Dinsdale
    Artemis by Andy Weir
    Hellbent by Gregg Hurwitz
    Darien: Empire of Salt by C F Iggulden
    Killer Intent by Tony Kent
    The Poison Belt by Arthur Conan Doyle
    Horns by Joe Hill
    Carver's Truth by Nick Rennison

    Non-Fiction:

    Parisians: An Adventure History of Paris by Graham Robb
    In the Shadow of the Dreamchild: The Myth and Reality of Lewis Carroll by Karoline Leach
    All Behind You, Winston: Churchill's Great Coalition 1940-45 by Roger Hermiston
    Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: The Life of Rosa Parks by Douglas Brinkley
    Migraine by Oliver Sacks
    Game of Queens: The Women Who Made 16th Century Europe by Sarah Gristwood
    The End of History and The Last Man by Francis Fukuyama
    House of Treason: The Rise and Fall of a Tudor Dynasty by Robert Hutchinson
    A Socialist History of the French Revolution by Jean Jaures

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    1. Non-BookDragons just don't understand us!

      Game of Queens is good but tries a little too hard on some aspects. I won't spoil those, and besides it is still a quality read. I have House of Treason on my physical shelves somewhere. I've had it for ages and not gotten to it yet, big surprise.

      Looks like a great haul for you - enjoy!

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  5. Love and War- oh my gosh I remember seeing those two debate on TV and all I could think was- they must have some VERY interesting discussions!

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    1. Right?? I just could not pass it up. I don't even understand how two people with soooooooo wide a discrepancy in their political beliefs could not only get married, but STAY MARRIED! More power to them for making it work!

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  6. Looks like you did the library a favour by finding homes for all these books! I've finally given in to the fact that I need another bookcase and I have nowhere to put one...

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    1. Oh yes! They accept good-will donations for the books in order to buy new ones. I had no cash on me and the librarian was like, "It's okay, we are just happy that they will find a good home, take as many as you want". I don't have to be told twice to do that!

      My mom was here last week for Eleanor's birthday and I said I was also in need of another shelf. She said no, I just need to read the books I have instead of acquiring new ones. The nerve!! lol

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