Thursday, March 22, 2018

First Line Friday: A Roll of the Dice


First Line Friday is brought to you by Hoarding Books. It's super easy to participate. Just grab the book nearest you and post the first line. Or, you can bend the rules a bit, as I often do, and post the first paragraph, the first line of a certain chapter, etc. I once even posted the LAST line of the introduction of a book because it was THAT good. Then head over to Hoarding Books to check out the others who have posted from the linky widget and see what lines they have selected.

This week I am sharing a book that is deeply important to me. Last night I met the author, Agnes Schwartz, when she gave a talk at the fabulous and amazing Durham Museum. She is a survivor of the Holocaust and World War II. Please check out this post to learn more about her story and the struggles she faced, both during the war and after as she and her father tried to put their lives back together. These stories are so crucial to our understanding of history, and that was much of Mrs. Schwartz's message: this can never be allowed to happen again. There are so few survivors left, we must continue passing their stories on into each new generation. we can never allow those fiends who deny these crimes against humanity to be louder than we are.

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"I started writing this memoir when I turned sixty in 1993. While I had contemplated doing this for a long time, I suddenly felt an urgency to do so. As each year flew by faster than the previous, I became more and more aware of my mortality. To put my life's story on paper had become increasingly important, important enough to invest in a laptop computer because I knew without that, this project would not get done."

I am still in a bit of awe over the talk last night. being face to face with someone who survived the terrible atrocities committed by the Nazis across Europe...was an incredibly humbling experience. When it was my turn to get my book signed, I asked if I could hold her hand. She said yes and I held her hand between my two, not knowing what else to say except "Thank you". I must've said it five times. She patted the top of my hand and smiled. I will never forget this, as long as I live. And I will make sure I do all I can to ensure that her story, and the stories of so many like hers, are never forgotten.

Sarah

18 comments:

  1. I read your blog post about listening to her story. It was powerful - thank you for sharing.

    I'm featuring Hurricane Season by Lauren Denton on my blog today, but I'm going to share the first line from the book I'm currently reading. Here's the first line from A Chance at Forever by Melissa Jagears:

    "I wish you luck, George."
    "It's Aaron now. Don't forget." Aaron Firebrook tried not to let Mr. Gray's slip of the tongue make him even more nervous.

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    1. Thank you so much for checking out that post too. I now we all KNOW about the Holocaust, but the experience of meeting a survivor first-hand is something that can not be equaled. It was such a powerful experience and I will never forget it.

      Thanks for sharing your line with me, have a lovely weekend Iola.

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  2. Happy Friday!

    My FLF comes from a book I’m reading now, Only Yours by Susan Mallery….

    MONTANA HENDRIX’S perfectly good morning was thwarted by a hot dog, a four-year-old boy and a Lab and golden retriever mix named Fluffy.

    Have a great weekend and happy reading!😀

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    1. Thank you for sharing your line, have a wonderful weekend.

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  3. Opening the door was the hardest part. Not that she expected to find it locked, because no one out here in this part of Texas ever locked anything. The Countess and the Cowboy by Kathleen Y'Barbo from the Seven Brides for Seven Texas Rangers Romance Collection

    Happy Friday and Happy Reading! :)

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    1. Thank you for sharing your line, happy Saturday!

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  4. The book I'm featuring on my blog this week is Love on the Mend by Karen Witemeyer. I love all the books I've read of hers. Here, I will share the first line of chapter 17 from the book I'm currently reading, The Social Tutor by Sally Britton. "Thomas waited for her arrival, this time on Christine's side of the brook, his breath turning to fog in the cold air." Wishing you a wonderful weekend.

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    1. Thank you for sharing your line this week, happy Saturday!

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  5. I'm sharing the first two lines from A Most Noble Heir by Susan Anne Mason on my blog today. Here, I will post the first line from the novel I'm currently reading, Beneath the Surface by Lynn H. Blackburn.

    "Homicide investigator Ryan Parker flashed a thumbs-up to his dive buddy and fellow homicide investigator, Gabe Chavez."

    Let me tell you, that thumbs-up quickly becomes a thumbs-down!!! This book is really gripping. I can't figure it out!!! 😄 Happy Friday.

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    1. Thanks for sharing your line this week Nicole, hope you figure out what the heck is going on! Happy Saturday

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  6. Happy Friday! My first line is from Bridgette by Patricia PacJac Carroll:

    “Bridgette, get up. The sun and the rest of us have been working for three hours.”

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    1. Happy Saturday Becky, thanks for sharing your line this week!

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  7. "The shoulder of the last valley shrugged free of the forest and at last the three riders gained the high plain, an empire of red grass sparely punctuated by clumps of wind-sculptured thornbush. Eastward, the Trackless Mountains rose above a colourless haze, snowcapped peaks reflecting chiselled planes of sunlight".

    Secret Harmonies by Paul J McAuley

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    1. Really sets the scene, doesn't it?? Thanks for sharing your line this week!

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  8. I’m sharing from Mary Connealy’s Now and Forever on my blog today, but here is the opening paragraph of another second in series book with a heroine that loves tending her sheep, Beloved Hope by Tracie Peterson:

    Oregon City, Oregon
    May 1850

    “You can’t be serious.” Hope Flanagan looked at the man who sat opposite her at her sister and brother-in-law’s kitchen table. “You expect me to testify at the Cayuse trial.”

    Happy Friday!

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    1. Hey Yvette, thank you for sharing your line this week, have a lovely weekend!

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  9. You got me at 'Hungarian' because I am always on the lookout for WorldReads authors! Agnes' book looks fascinating and how amazing to actually meet her. I imagine an unforgettable experience

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    1. Oh yes, please do read it. I am still in awe of meeting her. There are so few survivors left, we have to know their stories before they are gone. When you get a chance to read it, let me know what you think!

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