Saturday, May 8, 2021

Stacking the Shelves #145

  


Stacking the Shelves is a weekly feature co-hosted by Tynga's Reviews and Reading Reality. It is a chance to showcase all the goodies you've collected throughout the week, whether they're bought on-line or in-store, an ARC or a final copy, borrowed from a friend or the library, physical or digital, etc.

Library Treasure

NetGalley ARCs

Prime First Reads


On Wednesday I wandered the stacks for the first time in a year when I went to pick up A Furious Sky and I found all sorts of goodies. When I got home I discovered that I had DNF-ed the Amsterdam book in 2019 but I don't remember why so I am giving it a try again.

Happy Reading!
Sarah 

30 comments:

  1. Lots of these look interesting, particularly The Coffin Ship

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    1. I've started it and it is really interesting so far. On a visit to Ireland some years ago, the signs of the famine are still everywhere, it was very heavy and sad - particularly in the countryside anyway. The famine houses and penny walls still stand as a testament to those who suffered and died and it was incredibly moving.

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    2. I wondered whether "new" visitors to Ireland still see it because it has very much improved over the last decades. I see what got better and that's a lot. Still, the famine will always be with them.

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    3. It is most definitely still obvious to those who know the history. We visited in 2010 and I felt such a deep sadness when out in the countryside, despite the stunning scenery. It was not quite the same feeling in Dublin, though one must only look to the population numbers to see that Ireland has never really recovered, even 200 years on. It's interesting to hear the perspective of someone who saw the changes first hand over the last couple decades, because it was so palpable to me, I can't imagine what it was like even 30 or 70 or 100 years ago.

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    4. Ireland looks quite different from what it looked 30 or even 20 years ago. It was such a poor country, you almost felt like having passed the Iron Curtain rather than the Irish Sea. They have caught up a lot.

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    5. It's been 11 years now since we went, so I hope even more progress has been made since then. It's such a beautiful place but the sadness and trauma is palpable.

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    6. Definitely things have changed to the better. You see it even more in Northern Ireland that really improved after The Troubles (not that we went there, then, but the pictures were horrifying enough).

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    7. That's very good to hear. Belfast is at the top of my list for next places to travel in Europe. I have to see where Titanic was born. I've been to Cobh, her last port of call. Again, this is a trip for Eleanor because she loves all things Titanic also.

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    8. Fantastic. You have to see the Titanic museum. But there is so much more to see both in Belfast and Northern Ireland, of course. The Giant Causeway is a Must!

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    9. Oh yes, the Causeway is on the list too! I was so bummed when we were in Ireland in 2010 and just could not make time in the schedule for Belfast at least. We were SO close. But we will get there, eventually.

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    10. Everything is "close" once you're on the island. And in the meantime they even have a motorway between Dublin and Belfast. When we went the first time, the streets were really, really bad.

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    11. EXACTLY! Time just did not allow, unfortunately. It was depressing. I don't know that I would trust myself driving. I would be the American who caused an accident because they forget which side of the road to drive on :(

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    12. I can imagine, that's not easy for other Europeans, either. But, honestly, you get used to it quickly.

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    13. Probably. And I think it would be fun to rent a car and drive around for a few days, not just one day trip because then I would actually have a chance to practice and get used to it.

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  2. As always, you've got a fascinating haul there. I grew up near mounds constructed by Native Americans so I would be interested in the book about them.

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    1. That's so cool! Are there books about them, maybe by a local historian? I would be interested in reading anything about the mound-builders.

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  3. Yeah! Your libraries are open again [does Snoopy dance!] An interesting mix as always....

    'Just' 7 from me - but I am starting to cut back a little... [grin]

    Non-Fiction:

    Waiting for War - Britain 1939-1940 by Barry Turner
    The Stonemason - A History of Building Britain by Andrew Ziminski
    This Dark Business - The Secret War Against Napoleon by Tim Clayton

    Fiction:

    Cross the Line by James Patterson
    The Court of Miracles by Kester Grant
    The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton
    Persepolis Rising by James S A Corey

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    1. I will need to know our thoughts on The Stonemason before digging in, but it sounds like something I would like. Our libraries have actually been open for a bit, but I have tried to keep our visits super short - just in to get our holds and then back out again. Don't want to linger too long. Eleanor was with her dad this time however, so I wandered a bit and it was glorious. Not for my TBR, lol, but for me.

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  4. The Darkest Flower cover is so pretty!

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    1. That's what initially caught my eye and I am glad I read it, it was a nasty little thriller with a total sociopath and I loved it!

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  5. Interesting shelf. I haven't even heard of most of them, even the authors. Though I have read books about Sophie Scholl, of course. I've been thinking about re-reading one of them the other day. She has been in the media a lot lately. First of all, she would have turned a hundred this year. And second, there was one of these stupid anti-maskers, anti-vacciners etc. who claimed she was like Sophie Scholl because of all the restrictions we have at the moment due to Covid.

    Looking forward to your reviews.

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    1. It is truly appalling to me, those on the right who equate masks with the yellow Star of David. It is an absolutely horrific and insulting comparison. We've had some of those here as well, not saying they're like Sophie, but making that comparison. I am fully vaccinated but I will continue to wear my mask, as will Eleanor, since she can not be vaccinated yet. I am not worried about myself getting COVID, but her and we will continue to take every precaution that we have been for the last 14 months.

      Do you have books to recommend about Sophie? I would love to read more.

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    2. The 'classic' telling of her tale (published in 1986) is 'Sophie Scholl and the White Rose' by Annette Dumbach & Jud Newborn. It's just on the edge of going into my 'Read Next' pile.

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    3. I will have to get that one. I only have the one by her sister Inge on my TBR. I am sure there are many more, especially in Germany, that I will have a hard time finding translations of. Thanks for the heads-up on this one!

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  6. Strangely enough, I have not reviewed any of them because none of them have been translated (except for the one by Inge). So far. I wonder whether with the new reminder of her turning 100, there will be some translations available. I'll look out and let you know. The one recommended by @CyberKitten sounds good.

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    1. I feared that not being translated would be my biggest obstacle in reading more about Sophie, Hans, and their mission. I hope more will be translated, otherwise my recovery in re-learning German is going to have to get very very good.

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    2. That is a big problem when you only speak English, books only get translated into English when they are really, really successful not only in their own language but in several others. A good example is Nowhere in Africa, a hugely successful story about a Jewish girl whose parents flew to Kenya before the war, based on her real life. She even met Otto Frank later on. And she wrote a biography that has not been translated. Anyway, they made a film out of it (not as great as the book, of course), the film received an Oscar for best foreign movie and it took another ten years until the book was translated into English!

      In any case, even though this is not a non-fiction, it partly is and I think you would really like it.

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    3. I mean, I get WHY so many don't get translated, because it is all about money. I can't even imagine how many languages I would have to learn to read all the books in the entire world that interest me.

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    4. I know what you mean but it's a pity, especially with some great books but even with others, you just don't have the amount of choices we have if you only speak English. :(

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